Wright’s Brigade, Anderson’s Division, Hill’s Corps

Posted to the Project on 04 May 09

Wright's Brigade

Wright’s Brigade served as a member of Anderson’s Division in the Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. The brigade is honored by a monument and an advanced position tablet.

About the Main Monument

When was it dedicated? Erected circa 1910. The last monument was completed on December 19, 1910.

What is it made out of? Foundation: Concrete. Monument: Polished smooth red Maine granite. Plaque: Bronze.

What size is it? 3.8 feet x 3.4 feet diameter base. Height 5’4″. Tablet measures 4 feet by 3 feet 8 inches and weighs 300 pounds. Overall weight is 3000 pounds.

Who made it? Albert Russell & Sons Co. of Newburyport, Massachusetts. Erected by the United States War Department.

What does it depict? Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

What does it honor? One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments. Designed by E. B. Cope and erected by the U.S. War Department. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Some of the tablets were made from melted down Civil War cannon. The tablets describe the itinerary and movements of each brigade.

How is it inscribed? The monument reads,

C. S. A.
HILLS CORPS ANDERSON’S DIVISION
WRIGHT’S BRIGADE
3rd, 22nd, 48th Regiments and 2D Battalion Georgia Infantry

July 2. Formed line here in the forenoon. Advanced at 6 P. M. and dislodged Union troops posted near the Codori House capturing several guns and many prisoners. Pushing on broke the Union line at the stone wall south of the Angle and reached the crest of the ridge beyond capturing more guns. The supports on the right being repulsed and those on the left not coming up with both flanks assailed and converging columns threatening its rear it withdrew fighting its way out with heavy losses and unable to bring off the captured guns.

July 3. Advanced 600 yards to cover the retreat of Pickett’s Division. Afterward was moved to the right to meet a threatened attack.

July 4. In line here all day. At dark began the march to Hagerstown.

Present 1450 Killed 146 Wounded 394 Missing 333 Total 873

When was this photograph taken? June 7, 2011.

Where is it located? Located Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325. Located on West side of West Confederate Avenue, across from Virginia Monument at Spangler Woods.

Is this monument located along the NPS Auto Tour route? Yes.

Has this monument been moved or changed? This monument has not been materially altered or moved.

Monument Details, Alternative Views, and Contextual Views

no images were found

Secondary Monuments and Markers

Advanced Position Tablet of Wrights BrigadeMonument Title: Advanced Position Marker

Photographed: October 5, 2007.

Location: Cemetery Ridge, southwest of the Copse of Trees. Located along High Water Mark Trail in Codori Field, West of US Regulars Monument at the “Slashing.” Monument was moved in 1993 after car accident from it’s original position on Emmitsburg Road. This monument is marked on the map above by a RED pushpin.

Description: Iron tablet denotes advanced position of the brigade during the battle. Cast iron tablet, 3’8″ x 3’4″, with raised inscription painted in a contrasting color and mounted on fluted cast iron post. All 4’4″ H. Reads as follows,

ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
HILL’S CORPS ANDERSON’S DIVISION
WRIGHT’S BRIGADE
3rd 22nd 48th Regiments and 2D Battalion Georgia Infantry

July 2. Formed line in forenoon. Advanced at 6 P. M. and dislodged Union troops posted near the Codori House capturing several guns and many prisoners. Pursuing on broke the Union line at the stone wall south of the angle reached the crest of the ridge beyond capturing more guns. The supports on the right being repulsed and those on the left not coming up with both flanks assailed and converging columns threatening its rear it withdrew fighting its way out with heavy losses and unable to bring off the captured guns.

At Gettysburg

Commander: Brig. Gen. Ambrose Ransom Wright (April 26, 1826 – December 21, 1872) was a lawyer, Georgia politician, and Confederate general in the American Civil War. More about this officer.

After Action Report: After Action Report of Brig. Gen. A. R. Wright (will open a pop up window).

Regiments

3rd Georgia Infantry.

Commander: Col. Edward J. Walker (-1864). Citadel 1851. Lawyer in Georgia. Wounded at Manassas Gap in late July 1863. Died of “wounds and disease” in Richmond County, Georgia in August 1864.

Strength: 441; 49 killed, 139 wounded, 31 missing.

Supplemental Materials: None.

22nd Georgia Infantry

Commander: Col. Joseph Wasden (-1863). Killed in action at Gettysburg.

Strength: 400; 41 killed, 70 wounded, 60 missing.

Officers Killed at Gettysburg:

  • Capt. Isaac W. Callaway, Company K
  • Capt. Jeff W. Leonard, Company D
  • Colonel Joseph Wasden, field officer

Supplemental Materials: None.

48th Georgia Infantry.

Commander: Col. William Gibson (1822-1893). Native of Warren, County. Lawyer and judge in Augusta. Wounded at Malvern Hill and Gettysburg. Post-war president of the Georgia Senate.

Strength: 395; 70 killed, 97 wounded, 57 missing.

Officers Killed at Gettysburg:

  • Lt. Francis M. Allen, Company D, aged 34
  • Lt. J. Dooly Burnside, Company K, aged 26
  • Lt. William M.J. Hall, Company F
  • Capt. John A. Harlow, Company D, aged 41
  • Lt. Daniel W. Jarvis, Company G
  • Lt. Charles A. McAfee, Company I
  • Capt. Thomas N. Polhill, Company E, aged 23
  • Capt. Uriah L. Skinner, Company D, aged 26

Supplemental Materials: None.

2nd Georgia Battalion

Commander: Maj. George W. Ross (-1863). Mortally wounded on July 2, dying on August 2.

Strength: 173; 24 killed, 37 wounded, 21 missing.

Officers Killed at Gettysburg:

  • Lt. Thomas K. Campbell, Company B
  • Lt. Edward Granniss, Company B
  • Capt. Charles R. Redding, Company C
  • Major George W. Ross, Field Officer

Supplemental Materials: None.

Comments on this Post

3 Responses to “Wright’s Brigade, Anderson’s Division, Hill’s Corps”

  1. HankC says:

    Jenny, do you know the content of the the second marker?

    just repition of the first, perhaps.

    IIRC, it was wright with whom the 1st Minnesota engaged…

  2. Jenny says:

    When I was last at Gettysburg, the older plaque had been removed … Presumably for cleaning/repair because as you can see it is quite beaten up.

    The second plaque simply recites the July 2 section of the first plaque.

  3. billy williamson says:

    My Great Great Grandfather fought and was wounded with the 22ng Ga. His name was William Hammock later changed or misspelled to Hammack.He was wounded at Malvern Hill, lost an eye and stayed with the regiment, fought in most of the major battles in the east and signed the surrender papers at Appamattox.

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